Petit Echo nr 1121 – 2021/05

Climatic change is an obvious fact today; climatic events that were once very rare in Africa are now frequent; there are also the disastrous consequences of unregulated mining and land grabbing by multinationals. Populations know that something has drastically changed because there is already talk of “climate immigrants”. How can we help them to design local responses to climate change and contribute to ecological restoration?

The confreres who testify in this issue live or have lived alongside various populations that are victims and sometimes perpetrators of these harmful changes, and together with the population, they are committed to providing solutions to the climatic challenges to preserve our common home, responsibility that the Creator has entrusted to all of humanity.

Does what we are doing to our planet today have lasting consequences on human life? In 1973, a mathematician, Edward Lorenz, asked the question: “Can the flapping of a butterfly’s wings in Brazil cause a hurricane in Texas?”

Petit Echo nr 1120 – April 2021

Petit Echo nr 1120 - April 2021

Editorial

The consequences of the Covid-19 pandemic have revealed the financial fragility of, even, great nations.

It is a fact that any activity we undertake in the execution of the mission entrusted to us, implies, either upstream or downstream, a financial aspect, an investment.

In this issue number 4 of the Petit Echo, different treasurers help us to ask ourselves good questions in the different matters of an economic nature and to envisage good management practices so that our finances and our patrimony, effectively accompany us in the realisation of the mission, to which we are called, for the African world and for all the people of God, wherever we serve.

The editorial board of The Petit Echo, given the interest of the articles proposed for this issue, is sorry not to be able to illustrate most of the articles with the beautiful photos from our different communities. We have given priority to the information and reflections that our treasurers have generously shared with us.

Freddy Kyombo